Wednesday & Thursday, Jan 16 & 17

link  https://b.socrative.com/login/student/ and type in RAIDERP6A as the room number

The Constitution
Lesson
  • How does the Constitution allot and share powers between the states and the federal government?
  • What rights are guaranteed by the Constitution?
  • VOCABULARY IS DUE TODAY
  1. Pluralism & B-1 Bomber reading quiz
  2. Socrative Constitution assignment…students only use Arabic numbers in their responses..37 questions and work in pairs
  3. students will have some time in class to work on other assignments
Standards
CON-1
The Constitution emerged from the debate about the weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation as a blueprint for limited government.
LOR-1.A
Explain how democratic ideals are reflected in the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution.
PMI-1
The Constitution created a competitive policy-making process to ensure the people’s will is represented and that freedom is preserved.
PMI-1.A
Explain the constitutional principles of separation of powers and checks and balances.
PMI-1.A.1
The powers allocated to Congress, the president, and the courts demonstrate the separation of powers and checks and balances features of the U.S. Constitution.
CON-2.B.1
The interpretation of the Tenth and Fourteenth Amendments, the commerce clause, the necessary and proper clause, and other enumerated and implied powers is at the heart of the debate over the balance of power between the national and state governments.
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Monday & Tuesday, Jan 14&15

(Ms. H out sick)
  • What were the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation?
  • What quotes from Brutus 1 and Federalists Papers #10, 51, 70, 78 back up the main ideas?
  • What are the 5 major points of the Declaration of Independence?
  • What kind of influence did the 3/5 Compromise, Shay’s Rebellion, and the Great “Connecticut” Compromise have on the Constitution?
  • What is the importance of the 10th & 14th Amendments, and the “necessary & proper” clause?
  1. Group Google slide review activity.
Homework

work on your vocabulary and video assignments

Standards
CON-1.B.1
Specific incidents and legal challenges that highlighted key weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation are represented by the:

  • Lack of centralized military power to address Shays’ Rebellion
  • Lack of tax-law enforcement power
CON-1.B
Explain the relationship between key provisions of the Articles of Confederation and the debate over granting the federal government greater power formerly reserved to the states.
CON-1.A.2
Anti-Federalist writings, including Brutus No. 1, adhered to popular democratic theory that emphasized the benefits of a small decentralized republic while warning of the dangers to personal liberty from a large, centralized government.
CON-1.A.1
Madison’s arguments in Federalist No. 10 focused on the superiority of a large republic in controlling the “mischiefs of faction,” delegating authority to elected representatives and dispersing power between the states and national government.
CON-1.A
Explain how Federalist and Anti- Federalist views on central government and democracy are reflected in U.S. foundational documents.
CON-1
The Constitution emerged from the debate about the weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation as a blueprint for limited government.
LOR-1.B.2
Different aspects of the U.S. Constitution, as well as the debate between the Federalist No. 10 and Brutus No. 1, reflect the tension between the broad participatory model and the more filtered participation of the pluralist and elite models.
CON-1.C.1
Compromises deemed necessary for adoption and ratification of the Constitution are represented by the:

  • Great (Connecticut) Compromise
  • Electoral College
  • Three-Fifths Compromise
  • Compromise on the importation of slaves
CON-1.C.2
Debates about self-government during the drafting of the Constitution necessitated the drafting of an amendment process in Article V that entailed either a two-thirds vote in both houses or a proposal from two-thirds of the state legislatures, with final ratification determined by three-fourths of the states.
CON-1.C.3
The compromises necessary to secure ratification of the Constitution left some matters unresolved that continue to generate discussion and debate today.
PMI-1.A.2
Federalist No. 51 explains how constitutional provisions of separation of powers and checks and balances control abuses by majorities.
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Thursday & Friday, January 10 & 11

  • Who is in charge and what are they in charge of?
  • How does Federalism divide power?
  1. Power Elite reading quiz
  2. NOTES-Power and Federalism

Homework

  • Read and be ready for a quiz over Pluralism and the B-1 Bomber readings next class

Standards

LOR-1.B.1

Representative democracies can take several forms along this scale:

  • Participatory democracy, which emphasizes broad participation in politics and civil society
  • Pluralist democracy, which recognizes group-based activism by nongovernmental interests striving for impact on political decision making
  • Elite democracy, which emphasizes limited participation in politics and civil society
LOR-1.B
Explain how models of representative democracy are visible in major institutions, policies, events, or debates in the U.S.
LOR-1.B.3
The three models of representative democracy continue to be reflected in contemporary institutions and political behavior.
CON-1.A
Explain how Federalist and Anti- Federalist views on central government and democracy are reflected in U.S. foundational documents.
CON-2
Federalism reflects the dynamic distribution of power between national and state governments.
CON-2.A
Explain how societal needs affect the constitutional allocation of power between the national and state governments.
CON-2.A.1
The exclusive and concurrent powers of the national and state governments help explain the negotiations over the balance of power between the two levels.
CON-2.A.2
The distribution of power between federal and state governments to meet the needs of society changes, as reflected by grants, incentives, and aid programs, including federal revenue sharing, mandates, categorical grants, and block grants.
CON-2.B
Explain how the appropriate balance of power between national and state governments has been interpreted differently over time.
CON-2.B.2

The balance of power between the national and state governments has changed over time based on U.S. Supreme Court interpretation of such cases as:

  • McCulloch v. Maryland (1819), which declared that Congress has implied powers necessary to implement its enumerated powers and established supremacy of the U.S. Constitution and federal laws over state laws
  • United States v. Lopez (1995), which ruled that Congress may not use the commerce clause to make possession of a gun in a school zone a federal crime, introducing a new phase of federalism that recognized the importance of state sovereignty and local control

LOR-1

A balance between governmental power and individual rights has been a hallmark of American political development.

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Tuesday & Wednesday, January 8 & 9

Lesson
  • Who are the major philosophers that influenced the Framers?
  • What is “popular sovereignty?”
  • Why is the idea of a “social contract” important?
  1. go over first day stuff VERY quickly
  2. NOTES-Who’s In Charge and Political Philosophers
  3. assign homework of Power Elite reading
  4. go to the Google classroom so that you can get started on the Crash Course videos that will be due soon (January 19 before midnight)
Homework
read and be ready for the Power Elite quiz next class
Standards
  • LOR-1.A
  • Explain how democratic ideals are reflected in the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution.
  • LOR-1.A.1The U.S. government is based on ideas of limited government, including natural rights, popular sovereignty, republicanism, and social contract.
  • LOR-1A balance between governmental power and individual rights has been a hallmark of American political development.

 

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FINAL EXAMS Dec 14-19

  • Friday, Dec 14  5th & 7th
  • Monday, Dec 17  1st & 3rd
  • Tuesday, Dec 18 6th & 8th
  • Wednesday, Dec 19  2nd & 4th

Daily schedule for exams (in the portables with C-lunch):

  • 9:05-10:00    Study Session
  • 10:07-12:07   Exam time
  • 12:14-1:33      Study Session
  • 1:33-2:13        Lunch
  • 2:20-4:20      Exam Time

 

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